No better greeting than my mom opening a bottle of champagne in the car at the airport curb. We’re officially home and officially celebrating! (at San Francisco International Airport (SFO))

No better greeting than my mom opening a bottle of champagne in the car at the airport curb. We’re officially home and officially celebrating! (at San Francisco International Airport (SFO))

Dad, do you know how hard it is to find a purple Hawaiian shirt? (at Waikiki, Hawaii)

Dad, do you know how hard it is to find a purple Hawaiian shirt? (at Waikiki, Hawaii)

Nico takes a picture of me taking a picture of our last sunset of the trip. Goodnight day 199. (at Waikiki Beach)

Nico takes a picture of me taking a picture of our last sunset of the trip. Goodnight day 199. (at Waikiki Beach)

Parking lot in Waikiki is completely packed.

Parking lot in Waikiki is completely packed.

Sunset (Waikiki beach, Honolulu) #nofilter. The snow of yesterday seems so far away… (at Waikiki Beach)

Sunset (Waikiki beach, Honolulu) #nofilter. The snow of yesterday seems so far away… (at Waikiki Beach)

When we were planning our trip, my main argument for going around the world eastward was that we could stop in Hawaii for a couple of days at the end before hitting the full reality of being home (it turns out the weather worked out better too). But I’m adding a new reason—the international date line! We get to do today over again…in Hawaii! (at on the beach in hawaii)

When we were planning our trip, my main argument for going around the world eastward was that we could stop in Hawaii for a couple of days at the end before hitting the full reality of being home (it turns out the weather worked out better too). But I’m adding a new reason—the international date line! We get to do today over again…in Hawaii! (at on the beach in hawaii)

After returning from a trip abroad earlier this year, my friend Alexandra wrote an email about her experience ending it with something like this: I arrived at U.S. Customs and the officer said ‘welcome home’, as they always do, and I started crying, as I always do. Since her charming email I’ve been thinking about hearing those same words and telling myself ‘you will not cry.’ Instead, it went like this. Officer: Passports. Nico: Good morning. Officer: You have really small handwriting. Karina: We had a lot to fit in. Officer: Wha’d you do, travel around the world? Karina and Nico: Yes. Officer: I see. Have a nice day. Denied those two words and after the second red eye flight in three days, we stumbled out of baggage claim, turned the corner and hit a traffic jam of foreigners taking pictures in front of a sign. The path cleared and there it said, ‘Welcome to the United States.’ And my heart swelled almost as fast as my tear ducts. (Also, despite Nico’s ‘really, another pen?’ glare, I maintain the purchase of a new .5mm pen in Seoul was critical to our successful reentry to the United States of America.) (at Honolulu International Airport (HNL))

After returning from a trip abroad earlier this year, my friend Alexandra wrote an email about her experience ending it with something like this: I arrived at U.S. Customs and the officer said ‘welcome home’, as they always do, and I started crying, as I always do. Since her charming email I’ve been thinking about hearing those same words and telling myself ‘you will not cry.’ Instead, it went like this. Officer: Passports. Nico: Good morning. Officer: You have really small handwriting. Karina: We had a lot to fit in. Officer: Wha’d you do, travel around the world? Karina and Nico: Yes. Officer: I see. Have a nice day. Denied those two words and after the second red eye flight in three days, we stumbled out of baggage claim, turned the corner and hit a traffic jam of foreigners taking pictures in front of a sign. The path cleared and there it said, ‘Welcome to the United States.’ And my heart swelled almost as fast as my tear ducts. (Also, despite Nico’s ‘really, another pen?’ glare, I maintain the purchase of a new .5mm pen in Seoul was critical to our successful reentry to the United States of America.) (at Honolulu International Airport (HNL))

Did I mention it’s snowing in Seoul?

Did I mention it’s snowing in Seoul?

So what’s a girl to do on a snowy day in Seoul?  Find the city’s largest bookstore and hang out with the pens, of course. (at 교보문고 (Kyobo Bookstore))

So what’s a girl to do on a snowy day in Seoul? Find the city’s largest bookstore and hang out with the pens, of course. (at 교보문고 (Kyobo Bookstore))

A mural of trees is the only green I see—it’s snowing in #Seoul! (at 종각역 (Jonggak Stn.))

A mural of trees is the only green I see—it’s snowing in #Seoul! (at 종각역 (Jonggak Stn.))

Man down. It took 196 days of traveling around the world before one of us got food poisoning, but it finally happened. And right in the middle of 2 flights—after arriving in Bangkok and before taking off on a red eye for Seoul. The good news is Nico is already feeling better and there is lots of ginger ale in the hotel vending machine, the bad news is we only have a 36 hour layover here so this may be all we see.

Man down. It took 196 days of traveling around the world before one of us got food poisoning, but it finally happened. And right in the middle of 2 flights—after arriving in Bangkok and before taking off on a red eye for Seoul. The good news is Nico is already feeling better and there is lots of ginger ale in the hotel vending machine, the bad news is we only have a 36 hour layover here so this may be all we see.

I’ve developed a love for spirit houses in Thailand. A spirit house is a shrine that looks like a mini house or temple and they’re outside of nearly every house and business to shelter spirits (like ancestors). They often have figures, animals, and sometimes even furniture with offerings of flowers, fruits, and incense left regularly, if not daily. As a tourist walking around, it’s just magical to spot one every 30 feet. (Note to my descendants: I would like a couch. And an elephant to keep me company, please.)

I’ve developed a love for spirit houses in Thailand. A spirit house is a shrine that looks like a mini house or temple and they’re outside of nearly every house and business to shelter spirits (like ancestors). They often have figures, animals, and sometimes even furniture with offerings of flowers, fruits, and incense left regularly, if not daily. As a tourist walking around, it’s just magical to spot one every 30 feet. (Note to my descendants: I would like a couch. And an elephant to keep me company, please.)

Arguably, the best snack on a hot day in Thailand—sour starfruit and sugar.

Arguably, the best snack on a hot day in Thailand—sour starfruit and sugar.

My favorite temple in Chiang Mai, #Thailand. (at วัดเจดีย์หลวงวรวิหาร (Chedi Luang Varavihara Temple))

My favorite temple in Chiang Mai, #Thailand. (at วัดเจดีย์หลวงวรวิหาร (Chedi Luang Varavihara Temple))

Since everyone knows worms taste like chicken and since he’s eaten grasshopper tacos before, I’m focusing my betting, bribery, and taunting on Nico eating Thai water beetles. I am not making much progress.  (at Ta Prae sunday market)

Since everyone knows worms taste like chicken and since he’s eaten grasshopper tacos before, I’m focusing my betting, bribery, and taunting on Nico eating Thai water beetles. I am not making much progress. (at Ta Prae sunday market)